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  • 37 # Date: 2012-06-21 - 10:05
  • # Max Depth: 22m Duration: 35mins
Diver's Notes

Descended on anchor line and followed stepped rock ledges to where rocks meet sand and kelp. Followed sand edge hoping to see weedy sea dragons but not luck. But we could clearly hear the sounds of humpback whales singing. (we saw 2 humpbacks from the boat).
Dive leader Brad realised We were missing a diver was missing. He returned to surface leaving 4 of us. Soon after 1 diver hit 40bar and he and his buddy surfaced leaving just myself and buddy Jen. We finished the dive together swimming north and returning. Highlights were 2 giant bull rays.

Red rock cod
Crimson wrasse
Maori wrasse
Blue grouper
Comb wrasse
Hulla fish
Black tip bullseye
White ears
Scaly fin

* Did not exceed NDL. Surfaced with 8mins of no-deco time. Averaged 16m.

Dive Profile
Dive Location

  • Temp: Surf 20°C Bottom 16°C
  • Dive type : Recreational, Boat
  • Visibility: Good Water: Salt
Specific gear used
  • BCD: Oceanic - Excursion 2
  • Camera: SeaLife - DC1400
  • Regulator: Oceanic - Delta 4.2
  • Regulator: Oceanic - CDX5 First Stage
  • Camera: GoPro - Hero
  • Weights: 8.5 kg
Recent Divers in Sydney
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Dive Shop & Buddies
  • Dive buddies: Jen Ryan
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Dive Profile

Data provided by EOL.org

Species Identified

Achoerodus viridis (Steindachner, 1866) (Wrasse) Found in coastal rocky areas at depths to about 40 m . Max. length for female species . Protogynous hermaphrodite .
Ophthalmolepis lineolata (Valenciennes, 1839) (Maori wrasse) Found in coastal bays to offshore reefs, often in loose aggregations .
Atypichthys strigatus (Günther, 1860) (Australian mado) A schooling species, particularly common on coastal reefs in southern New South Wales . Also commonly found under jetties in harbors and large estuaries .
Scorpaena cardinalis Solander & Richardson, 1842 (Red rock cod) Inhabits rocks, crevices and caverns at all depths. Occasionally found in large rock pools in the lower littoral zone. Is nocturnally active and feeds mainly on small mobile benthic animals. Stalks its prey and swallows it whole .
Hypoplectrodes maccullochi (Whitley, 1929) (Half-banded seaperch) Inhabits shallow coastal and estuarine rocky reefs . Common in sponge areas, sometimes in loose aggregations .
Myliobatis australis Macleay, 1881 (Australian bull ray) Commonly found off beaches and over sand flats in shallow water. Also found offshore down to 85 m . Feeds mainly on crabs and shellfish . Ovoviviparous .
Coris picta (Bloch and Schneider, 1801) (Comb wrasse) Inhabits fairly deep sandy bottoms around rocky reefs.
Pempheris compressa (White, 1790) (Small-scale bullseye) Usually found on offshore reefs, in large schools. Juveniles found on coastal reefs and near entrance of coastal estuaries with rocky reefs.
Paraplesiops bleekeri (Günther, 1861) (Eastern blue devil) Benthic species which occurs inshore .
Parma microlepis Günther, 1862 (White-ear scalyfin) Inhabits rocky reefs.
Enoplosus armatus (White, 1790) (Bastard dory) Juveniles live in estuaries while adults occur in estuaries and on inshore and offshore rocky reefs and seagrass beds . Found either in large schools, in pairs or as solitary individuals . Neither anterolateral glandular groove nor venom gland is present .
Trachinops taeniatus Günther, 1861 (Eastern hulafish) Occurs inshore near reefs .
Pempheris affinis McCulloch, 1911 (Black-tipped bullseye) Found in coastal waters in rocky reefs, ledges and caves during day .
Glossolepis maculosus Allen, 1981 (Spotted rainbowfish) Inhabits high altitude (150-800 m) swamps and creeks. An egg laying species which prefer the following aquarium conditions: pH=7.8, H=12, 25°C water temperature.

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